18 December 2010

A Typical Day for PFC Bradley Manning


PFC Manning is currently being held in maximum custody. Since arriving at the Quantico Confinement Facility in July of 2010, he has been held under Prevention of Injury (POI) watch.

His cell is approximately six feet wide and twelve feet in length.

The cell has a bed, a drinking fountain, and a toilet.

The guards at the confinement facility are professional. At no time have they tried to bully, harass, or embarrass PFC Manning. Given the nature of their job, however, they do not engage in conversation with PFC Manning.

At 5:00 a.m. he is woken up (on weekends, he is allowed to sleep until 7:00 a.m.). Under the rules for the confinement facility, he is not allowed to sleep at anytime between 5:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. If he attempts to sleep during those hours, he will be made to sit up or stand by the guards.

He is allowed to watch television during the day. The television stations are limited to the basic local stations. His access to the television ranges from 1 to 3 hours on weekdays to 3 to 6 hours on weekends.

He cannot see other inmates from his cell. He can occasionally hear other inmates talk. Due to being a pretrial confinement facility, inmates rarely stay at the facility for any length of time. Currently, there are no other inmates near his cell.

From 7:00 p.m. to 9:20 p.m., he is given correspondence time. He is given access to a pen and paper. He is allowed to write letters to family, friends, and his attorneys.

Each night, during his correspondence time, he is allowed to take a 15 to 20 minute shower.

On weekends and holidays, he is allowed to have approved visitors see him from 12:00 to 3:00 p.m.

He is allowed to receive letters from those on his approved list and from his legal counsel. If he receives a letter from someone not on his approved list, he must sign a rejection form. The letter is then either returned to the sender or destroyed.

He is allowed to have any combination of up to 15 books or magazines. He must request the book or magazine by name. Once the book or magazine has been reviewed by the literary board at the confinement facility, and approved, he is allowed to have someone on his approved list send it to him. The person sending the book or magazine to him must do so through a publisher or an approved distributor such as Amazon. They are not allowed to mail the book or magazine directly to PFC Manning.


Due to being held on Prevention of Injury (POI) watch:

PFC Manning is held in his cell for approximately 23 hours a day.

The guards are required to check on PFC Manning every five minutes by asking him if he is okay. PFC Manning is required to respond in some affirmative manner. At night, if the guards cannot see PFC Manning clearly, because he has a blanket over his head or is curled up towards the wall, they will wake him in order to ensure he is okay.

He receives each of his meals in his cell.

He is not allowed to have a pillow or sheets. However, he is given access to two blankets and has recently been given a new mattress that has a built-in pillow.

He is not allowed to have any personal items in his cell.

He is only allowed to have one book or one magazine at any given time to read in his cell. The book or magazine is taken away from him at the end of the day before he goes to sleep.

He is prevented from exercising in his cell. If he attempts to do push-ups, sit-ups, or any other form of exercise he will be forced to stop.

He does receive one hour of “exercise” outside of his cell daily. He is taken to an empty room and only allowed to walk. PFC Manning normally just walks figure eights in the room for the entire hour. If he indicates that he no long feels like walking, he is immediately returned to his cell.

When PFC Manning goes to sleep, he is required to strip down to his boxer shorts and surrender his clothing to the guards. His clothing is returned to him the next morning.

240 comments:

  1. This is deplorable. While most people might not think this is any big deal, the fact that he is being held in the most restrictive manner with absolutely no variance or deviation from the set rules shows this to be a deliberate campaign of intimidation and unusual punishment by the Marine Corps. He is being punished and held indefinitely as a guilty party for something that they apparently have no intention of holding a trial for. I would hope everyone is paying attention to his suffering because this is the treatment that a totalitarian government gives its political dissidents. Thank you for bringing this treatment to the attention of the public.

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  2. This is so upsetting. Beyond upsetting. :(

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  3. Very sad. Please let him know he has support and his intent understood. He has given many Americans a new understanding of how war works (and doesn't work) and he has created a forced transparency that has made many very uncomfortable in positions of power. I hope he has the strength to be honest about his relationship with Assange and not implicate another because that is what his captors want to hear. They will try to break him, but it was a sense of integrity that guided Manning's actions -- do not let those with no integrity force you to tell the story they want to hear for their vindictive intentions. Good Luck.

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  4. Fairly harsh conditions considering he hasn't been found guilty of anything yet.

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  5. Which country is performing this inhumane treatment on someone who supposedly is innocent until proven guilty? Oh that's right, the land of the free.

    If the US does this to one of its own citizens, what hope for Julian Assange if ever they manage to "influence" Sweden or the UK to extradite him there.

    God help us if ever the US gets involved with Australia to that degree.

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  6. This is cruel and inhumane treatment by any standard. I find it ironic that the regime is supposedly design to protect him from self harm when it is so obviously going to cause deep irreporable scarring. This is soul destroying treatment. 5 months of it so far - and now we hear he's being offered plea bargains to implicate Julian Assange.

    How different is this to using electrodes to force false confessions? To me it is merely more deniable, the scars less obvious, the bloodstains more easily washed away.

    In recent year the U.S. has has repeatedly been shown a consistent abuser of human rights in many parts of the world. I listen to how many U.S. citizens are in poverty, without access to healthcare and employment while others profit and get richer. Discovering that it treats an innocent U.S. citizen in this way, is not surprising in the light of all this.

    It is no less troubling to me. Both for the sake of Bradley Manning, and given the influence this country still has, when the world needs benvolent power. We are facing immense difficulties on our planet alongside the rising military and commercial influence of the Chinese. Just now I don't see the U.S. as a viable alternative and hope we in Europe will not simple clutch onto U.S. skirts. The U.S. is as likely to abuse us for this as are the Chinese, perhaps moreso.

    Where are we to find humanity when so much of the power is lodged with countries and nations who don't know what it means? It makes me very sad.

    Mark

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  7. The treatment of PFC Manning is not in line with the Bill of Rights or the UN Declaration of Human Rights. I feel that Manning is a conscientious objector and should be given bail.

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  8. Any explanation or justification for this abnormal and abusive treatment of this innocent American citizen?

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  9. I'll believe this when i see it with my own eyes.

    By the way, I thought America was the land of the free? Why lock up somebody without charge or conviction?

    Good luck Bradley, the free world is thinking of you

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  10. I think we all need to organize an effective opposition where ever we live to end this torturous treatment, and to free Bradley. If he did what he is accused of he is a hero. If he didn't he is an innocent victim being subjected to soul-crushing conditions. I am ashamed of my goverment. However, that is nothing new.

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  11. I wonder about psychotropic drugs.

    Is he receiving any medication of any kind?

    Is his food preparation monitored?

    Is his water from a common source?

    It's truly sad when ones own government has so entirely lost credibility that these sorts of questions should occur.

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  12. Many people are outraged by this latest show of COWARDICE by the U.S.govt - how much COURAGE does it take to do those things to BRADLY MANNING??? if they had nothing to HIDE the approach would be very different...
    YOU ARE IN OUR THOUGHTS AND PRAYS!!! GOD BLESS YOU

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  13. It is a shame how the US government is allowing a hero who helped support his fellow troops, by bringing info to light in order to aid in the cessation of continued military aggression abroad.

    PFC Manning's sacrifice is one of the crucial big steps in helping his fellow troops come home from this futile & costly war based on lies.

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  14. This sound like the way you would punish someone on a life sentence for a week if they did something wrong, NOT an innocent man, and not for 7 mths.

    Remember he is still innocent until proven guilty.

    Where is the UN on this? If this was another country, the USA would have dragged us all of to war about this kind of treatment.

    Sorry Bradley, I didnt know about you until on of our own (Julian) was faced with this possibility.

    Therese from Australia

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  15. I hope you can let him know that so many people are thinking kind thoughts and utterly oppose this barbaric treatment.

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  16. Isn't there some kind of specialist team that can just free him? Because clearly the real criminals involved are getting away with much worse crimes while those brave souls sharing the truth end up rotting in jail like this. What kind of democracy is this? I would call it a multiple dictatorship

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  17. Can you tell us the nature of the anti-depressants Bradley is "being administered?" Is this voluntary? Is it to maintain his fitness for trial? The conditions causing that necessity appear to be generated by how he's being held.

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  18. Land of the brave and the free...............

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  19. Bi-Polar dictatorship!

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  20. This is utterly inhuman and disgraceful treatment of someone held without charges or conviction. It would even be considered inhuman if he HAD been charged and convicted.
    Why am I not surprised? There is little humanity left among those in charge in the US and among a large part of the population. It is time to face it that the US has become a "third world country" no insult to third world countries intended.

    Is there any organization that is helping Manning?How and where can we help?

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  21. Sad. Disgrace.
    Let him know that some people in France are reading this and are thinking of him.

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  22. My heart goes out to this poor young man. I fear part of what they are doing is using this treatment to break him down and get him to testify against Julian Assange. Lord knows what they'll do after they're finished with him.

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  23. More the reason to object and stand firm against this tyrant government. I lost all respect and honor when it comes to the union. In fact it's time to remove this union and all her leaders and reform a centralized government on the basic principals in which she was founded. Get rid of the FBI and nationalism. It will take every American to do this. Truly this Soldier is not the only one being treated like this.

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  24. PFC Manning has yet to be charged with any crime. How can he be held in such a way? Please let him know that millions of Americans are aware of his plight and are standing vigil for his safety and freedom.

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  25. Shame on the USA. Shame, shame, shame.

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  26. I have never been so ashamed to be an American. Mr. Manning is a pretrial detainee and, under our Constitution, is supposed to be presumed to be innocent. How disgraceful.

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  27. Wow... DISGUSTING doesn't even begin to cover it...

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  28. Why doesn't his attorney file a writ of habeas corpus? Not only would filing a writ bring this matter squarely to the public's attention, but it would be heard in a Federal Court, not a military tribunal.

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  29. Does Mr. Manning ever get to go outdoors or is he inside 24/7? Surely an American federal court would grant him relief from these barbaric conditions of confinement. File a writ of habeas corpus for crying out loud.

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  30. I got in The Daily Beast yesterday with the comments about Bradley and his abusive behavior by the US Government. Some people proclaimed him as a hero and others said he should be executed.
    I cannot understand why anyone would feel he should be executed. I would guess they simply do not understand his situation or simply too dumb to know what is really going on.
    I can only hope as many of you do that someday he will be a free man and this whole thing will simply go away.
    I've been following Julian Assange for about 6 months now and can only hope that our US Government does not get a hold of him, or as someone said, God forbid.

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  31. Totally outrageous and uncalled for. This man stands accused only, and should be afforded more humane conditions of confinement.

    What a shameful exhibition of US justice in action.

    Alan Taylor

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  32. First of all, thank you for taking on PFC Manning's case and treating it with the dilligence and zealousness it deserves. I'm sure the irony of the situation is not lost on you or PFC Manning: Documentation of rampant high-level corruption, civilian killings, and more is released, and absolutely nothing happens to anyone who is clearly implicated by the released documentation. However, the person who is accused of releasing the documentation is held under the harshest confinement conditions. That is not the America we fight for. The America we fight for is a country where justice is blind and the rule of law reigns supreme. Keep fighting, PFC Manning and Lieutenant Colonel David Coombs. You are making a difference, people notice it, and history will judge you favorably. You are the stuff of America.

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  33. This is incredible and amounts to torture. How vicious people in power can get. I'm praying for Mr. Manning and America: This country is meant to be an example of respect for human rights, instead it's teaching the world how to trample them under foot.

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  34. Thank you Bradley. Stay strong! Anon supports you :)

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  35. How deeply disturbing it is that the U.S. is so determined to crucify this man. If we really believe that the truth can set us free we need to make sure that it is not hidden but out there for all to see. The U.S. government is unaccountable and wikileaks is absolutely essential. Both Bradley and Julian should be hailed as heroes and offered complete pardon and immunity. God Bless them both.

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  36. The conditions in the Stasi prisons in the DDR were better than these.

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  37. I was arrested for a traffic violation once. I was in a cell for a few hours. It was horrible. That is why I know what Bradley Manning has to endure is hell.

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  38. What kind of drugs is Mr. Manning getting?
    Did he start taking them after he was incarcerated for not being charged with a crime?

    If this is how the land of the free treats one of its own who hasn't even been charged with a crime then how much worse does it treat one of its own that has been charged? Or, perhaps, someone who isn't even an American?

    (Oh, wait, just look up Anwar al-Awlaki and Kahlid El-Masri respectively.)

    The U.S. has gone mad.

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  39. Without doubt, this is intended to wear him down so that he 'cooperates', but how can anything he says (or anything any person receiving torture)be of value in a court? People have a breaking point, when that's reached, they'll say what they have to in order to get the torture to stop. Therefore, anything said should not be able to be used in a courtroom. This behaviour is inexcusable.

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  40. Please let him know that there are many of us that see him as a hero and a true patriot. It troubles and saddens me that he is being treated in this manner. Thank you for sharing this information with the world.

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  41. I give you the US, defender of human rights!!!

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  42. this kid shown us its the government of the usa who should be prosecuted for lies and crimes they made upon their own citizens and against the rest of the world
    we are anonymous
    we watch you
    expect us

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  43. The inhumane treatment of Bradley Manning is nothing short of Psychological Torture. Imagine having to put up with that 'protection' everyday. He has not been charged yet they still do this to their own citizens (And the powers tell the general public that the treatment of those at Gitmo is humane?) The deprivation and torture is designed to make him pliable so that he will agree to whatever 'charges' and deals are put before him. Is it any wonder that more and more people from around the world are turning against the U.S.A.?

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  44. Disgusting behaviour! Just for telling the truth-fascist US state.

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  45. I now understand what the military regards as "innocent until proven guilty." Given their treatment of Mr. Manning, I can only imagine how people in the brig are treated if they have been found guilty of some offense. Since our nation now practices torture and other inhuman practices, I have to regard this behavior by the military as part of a larger, more generalized deterioration in our national character. We seem to have lost both our humanity and our capacity for shame.

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  46. Are there any such laws stipulating mental abuse as defined as a human rights violation... in the Geneva Convention, etc.? The US is unaccountable to no one. As long as it is the strongest economic and military power, so will it maintain and reinforce a culture of impunity. Victor spoils. And unfortunately, the International Law System is catered (and governed) by the US. No one can challenge the country.

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  47. Wow! I am praying for him. It's one thing to be able to zone out, but it's another thing when you have to remain conscious all of the time in such conditions. I can imagine the thought of wanting to die comes frequently and yet there is no way to even do so. That in itself is torture, imo.
    Bradley is truly an American hero and the truest of patriots. God, please, please bless his soul.

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  48. Many of you will recall how outraged the US media became when the Iraqis captured a few US soldiers and dispalyed them on TV (during Gulf War I)... can you IMAGINE the howls of outrage that would follow if it was found that they had behaved as the US Military is behaving TOWARDS ONE OF ITS OWN?

    Tillman - blue-on-blue (and possibly, murder) covered up by the highest levels of teh chain of command;
    Jessica Lynch - propaganda that fell apart in hours;
    Manning - what any reasonable person would understand to be torture.

    This is why Thoreau's observation on State goons is so poignant:

    "The mass of men serve the state thus, not as men mainly, but as machines, with their bodies. They are the standing army, and the militia, jailers, constables, posse comitatus,(7) etc. In most cases there is no free exercise whatever of the judgment or of the moral sense; but they put themselves on a level with wood and earth and stones; and wooden men can perhaps be manufactured that will serve the purpose as well. Such command no more respect than men of straw or a lump of dirt. They have the same sort of worth only as horses and dogs."

    Cheerio


    GT

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  49. I read recently that one of the few instances where the USA executes for treason is disclosure of the identity of a covert operative.

    Cheyney, Rove and Libby should think hard before they out any more covert operatives.

    Some Americans like to bask in comparisons between their empire and the Roman Empire.

    I would say America's Caligula moment is almost upon her, concealing acts of inhumanity and illegality with ever more acts of inhumanity and illegality.

    "O Hamlet, what a falling-off was there!
    From me, whose love was of that dignity...

    to decline...

    And prey on garbage."

    Hamlet I:5

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  50. i post the same comment i posted yesterday on Greenwald's article about Manning's detenction:

    i just read that this poem by Erwin Markham helped Sidney Rittenberg to survive his one year of lightless solitary confinement in a chinese jail in '49 (followed by 5 more years in jail), maybe it would be nice if somehow Bradley could get it:

    They drew a circle that shut me out

    Heretic, rebel, a thing to flout

    But love and I had the wit to win;

    We drew a circle that took them in.

    ok Rittenberg had personal memories from his infancy regarding this song so it won't be so effective on Bradley but i hope it could help him anyway

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  51. I would expect this sort of treatment from the 'Bush/Cheney' terrorist organization...but why hasn't Obame stepped in to mitigate this sort of treatment of a US citizen...?!...even if he isn't a hero...which he is, of course!
    Could it be that once you become a member of the US military you cease being a free citizen of the US and are then under the pervue of the military who have their own rules and reglations - contrary to those you would have if you were not in the military, i.e., innocent until proven guilty?

    Could the conditions be any worse if he were convicted and sentenced?

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  52. It was mentioned that he can send mail... can he receive mail? I thought that we could inundate his mailing address with letters of support and encouragement.

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  53. God bless Bradley Manning.

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  54. This length of time in solitary is deplorable - military courts have a lot of secrets. Anyone with any info on the way these courts operate and further info on the sentancing and conditions of military detainees - please dump @ wikileaks.

    A disappointing fact about human rights day and assange's release is that very few people mentioned bradley manning. And it was his birthday on the 17th dec.

    People have the right to be charged and not kept on remand indefinitely (although generally conditions should be far better on remand - as you have yet to be proven guilty) and under very poor conditions.As he's half british i want to know what the UK are doing to demonstrate their new pro-human-rights outlook....?

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  55. and how are the US soldiers who killed, from a helicopter, innocent civilians, including 2 journalists? How are they being treated? When will their trial take place?

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  56. I think we should be taking up civil actions against the war crimes and lies that the leadership have cleared being implicated. Put the pressure back on the real criminals.

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  57. NO ONE IS FREE UNTIL PFC BRADLEY MANNING IS FREE !!!!!!!!

    In a Free and Open society, representatives keep NO SECRETS whom they represent.
    PFC Bradley Manning and WikiLeaks are supporters of the Free and Open Society.
    Be aware of everyone who suggest killing PFC Bradley Manning and alikes by lead poisoning or else, without or with rule of law (!)
    To those : Keep in mind : What goes around comes around !
    The line is long. Here are a few : Rush Limbaugh, Sarah Palin, King, ....
    They need to think more....and more. Talk less or better not at all.
    Appearently, the mouth gets so frustrated at the shortcoming of the brain, that decides, it has to blurt out something.....anything worthless.
    BTW - EXPOSING WAR CRIMES IS NOT A CRIME !!!
    We, the citizens of all nations, call for the US and Australian goverment to support, protect and assure PFC Bradley Manning - an innocent American Soldier and citizen - and Mr. Julian Assange - an innocent Australian citizen - both receive a FAIR, TRANPARENT, PUBLIC TRAIL.
    " They hang the man and flog the woman,
    Who gives the truth unto the common.
    Yet, let the greater villain loose,
    Who keeps the common from the truth. "

    " NEVER DOUBT, THAT A SMALL GROUP OF THOUGHTFUL, COMMITTED CITIZENS CAN CHANGE THE WORLD.
    INDEED, IT IS THE ONLY THING, THAT EVER HAS. "
    ( Margaret Mead )

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  58. Remember the prisoners as if chained with them—those who are mistreated—since you yourselves are in the body also.

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  59. Article 13 of the UCMJ prohibits punishment before conviction. Why hasn't his attorney brought this up?

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  60. Why am I not surprised? Put to a vote, I'm almost certain over 50% of Americans today would say PFC Manning is getting off easy, and many would vote to hang him with no trial.

    This is the new America we're witnessing, and it will no doubt worsen as we slide from world leader to world leper. This isn't the America of my youth. It is not the America that reached out to a destroyed Europe and helped it rebuild.

    To those in other countries, beware. America is fighting a class war and the rich who are spreading hate and fear in America to achieve their agenda are ruthless, and they will go after you next.

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  61. If Manning is not allowed to read letters from people not on the approved list, but instead must sign a letter of rejection, then everyone should send him a letter. The jailers would say, "not on your list, you must reject it." Manning would know by the thousands of letters he is obliged to reject that he is loved.

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  62. "People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.

    -- George Orwell

    What this man did is a crime, very simple. If everyone in the world played by the same rules I could care less, but their are rouge nations ready to do harm to impose their way of life.

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  63. Manning doesn't have the writ of habeus corpus. He is military and will be tried under UCMJ.
    There is no "innocent until proven guilty"


    he should have thought of this before he betrayed his country

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  64. The President, who is the Commander-In-Chief, should be impeached and removed from office for allowing this. Immediately.

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  65. what a bunch of sniveling whiners...obviously, you have no real view on the world. ANY prisoner in his position would be treated like this, and yes, it IS considered NORMAL! What is it with this plethora of fools making arguments based on "Feelings" without understanding the "Facts" about the way the military is allowed and supposed to do things. How naive...

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  66. Let him know he did the right thing!

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  67. This is what I expected. When I was a marine, we shadow watched other marines much like this. We even went into the bathroom stalls with them when they did. We woke them every half hour to make them drink water. Hell, a ship's captain can confine you on just bread and water. People are so ignorant of what goes on in their own military. I bet it's much worse in our huge prison populations. Americans don't know and don't want to know.

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  68. Every day I learn something new that makes me ashamed of this country

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  69. It seems to me that all those embarrassed by the release of the records should be scrutinized for their actions. Maybe many of them have done things that should put them in the cell right next to PFC Manning - or worse. If they were innocent there would be no fallout from this airing of the governments' dirty laundry.

    Additionally, it seems that many of the Al-Qaeda detainees were given better treatment and more privileges than we are seeing with Mr. Manning.

    This is appalling at best.

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  70. US. Leaders of the free world. Those words hold only fear to me now. Especially as an american.
    Something else I would like to point out to foreigners, as I am not sure how much is being reported on this outside of the states, The government has issued a warning to anyone who visits a wikileaks mirror site. The warning states (in short) that anyone who visits one of the sites will be barred from employment in any government position, be it from congress, the military, FBI, local politician, post office, right down to school bus driver.

    How is that a rational move on their behalf? The only thing that makes sense to me makes me sound like a crazy nutjob conspiracy theorist. That is the government does not want anyone entering any position to have any authority knowing the grievous crimes that it has committed.

    That honestly sounds like a regime grasping for its last vestiges of power, keeping any who seek honest knowledge of what is happening at bay and out of public offices.

    As crazy as it sounds, it is something to think about.

    And to foreigners, please don't look at the horrendous crimes executed by our country and then think the average american is in alignment with those things.

    Our government is destroying our country and our people. Our government is destroying the lives and livelihoods of people in other countries.

    We will surely be judged by history. We will stand before the courts of time with blood on our hands, and we will have no plea of innocence.

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  71. When signing a rejection form for letters, will PFC Manning see the names of the senders or at least the number of letters?
    If yes, why don't we all write messages to Quantico? Although PFC Manning cannot read them, he might notice that something must be going on if he was sent hundreds or even thousands of letters. He might guess that he has supporters outside.
    Pictures of "Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone" come to my mind, when uncounted owls try to deliver the mail. What do you think about "Operation Owl"?

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  72. 99% of the people posting comments sound completely naive.

    Inhumane? In a previous era (as recent as the Cold War), PFC Manning would be executed if found guilty.

    Much of the information he felt compelled to divulge via the internet was TOP SECRET and doing so is clearly an act of treason.

    There is no moral high ground that he took. With so much at stake, such decisions are not for a PFC to make.

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  73. Nelson Mandela had the poem "Invictus", which means unconquered, written on a scrap of paper. It inspired him while he was incarcerated.

    Can someone please get a copy to Bradley Manning, who is, with Julian Assange, heroic.

    Invictus, by William Ernest Henley (1849–1903)


    Out of the night that covers me,

    Black as the Pit from pole to pole,

    I thank whatever gods may be

    For my unconquerable soul.



    In the fell clutch of circumstance

    I have not winced nor cried aloud.

    Under the bludgeonings of chance

    My head is bloody, but unbowed.



    Beyond this place of wrath and tears

    Looms but the Horror of the shade,

    And yet the menace of the years

    Finds, and shall find, me unafraid.



    It matters not how strait the gate,

    How charged with punishments the scroll,

    I am the master of my fate:

    I am the captain of my soul.

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  74. Is this how they treat the detainees at Gitmo? Seems to me the terrorists have more rights than our citizens...and men and women of our armed forces.
    While, they must have evidence to keep him incarcerated and as a member of the US armed forces, he is in a very different legal venue..
    This has affected the security of our nation and also other nations.
    They must be keeping him locked down tight so no further communication can be made.
    But, this is very extreme and they are sitting on this wiki stuff too for too long.

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  75. Heroism on command, senseless violence, and all the loathsome nonsense that goes by the name of patriotism - how passionately I hate them!
    Albert Einstein

    I am thinking Bradley came to the same conclusion.. Kia Kaha.. I applaud that bravery after watching the summary executions of Saaed & Nasim I concur and change is nigh.. The oxymoron that is the machine of the United States military Intelligence is long overdue dismantling ... for it is surely defunct..
    Jacquelyne

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  76. I was in the Army, and knew quite a few people who did time in stockades, and even one or two who had been in Leavenworth. He is not being mistreated. He is suspected of gross violations of the UCMJ, and could conceivably be tried for treason, and hang. They are making sure he doesn't cheat the hangman, or hurt himself to get hospital time. Handing over 250,000 classified documents to a grandstander from Australia is not the same as getting drunk on a pass, or going AWOL for Christmas.

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  77. Well, at least he is not being held under the same conditions as prisoners at Guantanamo-- or Abu Ghraib. Looking for a silver lining...

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  78. America is turning into a dictatorship, and can nowadays be compared to countries like Pakistan and even Iraq. Only the western form of it.

    This is ridiculous. I hope for Manning all of this will soon be over.

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  79. Letters and postcards to:

    Bradley Manning
    c/o Courage to Resist
    484 Lake Park Ave #41
    Oakland CA 94610
    USA

    Letters will be opened, "contraband" discarded and then mailed weekly to Bradley via someone on his approved correspondence list.

    (From the http://www.bradleymanning.org website)

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  80. Wikileaks, Manning & Assange. The US may have invented the internet but seems quite far from having understood ist basic implications on media and society.

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  81. Mr. Manning took an oath to the US Army and broke it during war time. What he sowed, is what he is reaping.

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  82. As PFC Manning has not been convicted of a crime, I disagree with the conditions of his detention completely.
    If the informal allegations are true, then he has betrayed his country. In that case I hope he is charged with treason, convicted and penalized.

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  83. "There is no moral high ground that he took. With so much at stake, such decisions are not for a PFC to make."
    ------------------------------------------------
    I counter that with:

    "All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing"

    Nuremberg was full of people who said they were just obeying orders as well.

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  84. Support our troops. Unless they do something unthinkable, like challenge the official lie.

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  85. Traitor deserves it.

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  86. By the duration of this detention without trial one can clearly see the intention - to break and coerce PFC Manning, and to keep him away from the public who might otherwise sympathise.

    This does nothing to gain respect for the U.S. -- just another country holding political prisoners without trial.

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  87. Mr. Coombs, are you just describing how he should be treated to the letter of the (military) law or do you also know for a fact that this is how he is actually being treated? I ask this, because your description differs in some important respects from other accounts, such as http://www.salon.com/news/opinion/glenn_greenwald/2010/12/14/manning/index.html.

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  88. National security depends on not having traitors like this reveal secrets. He should consider himself lucky that the US is not China, Russia, et. al. If it was he would have already been tortured and then killed. Wake up people and stop hating the US and taking it for granted. If not, move out. You sicken me.

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  89. Since when is it criminal to expose the crimes of the criminals?

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  90. PUBLIC SERVICE / PUBLIC SERVANT / PUBLIC OFFICE/ PUBLIC= PEOPLE. Bribing, corrupting, defrauding, misleading a public servant to betray the public is in my veiw an act of treason and attracts the severest punishment.If the servant reports the attempt, he is rewarded, if he succomes and is charged he wil receive 1/3 the sentence, the corruptor 2/3 and permanent blackballing. So if that is acceptable we will have another loof at the Public CHAMPIONS Assange and Manning. Oh Boy do those burrow-rats have lots to hide!!!

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  91. im sorry but this does not seem like cruel or unusual punishment if anything his punishment does not fit his crime a crime committed during war he may have brought information to light but he betrayed the trust bestowed upon him by his country

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  92. Here's the thing, folks; PFC Manning is not protected by the Constitution of the United States of America. No Soldier is. Uniformed servicemembers are under the jurisdiction of the UCMJ, and under those rules, this is all perfectly legal, since this boy may be a traitor. I'm a raging, bleeding heart liberal, but I'm also a former soldier, and the fact is that this boy betrayed the uniform. He took an oath to protect those secrets; he then did the opposite. It sucks that this is the case, and I applaud him for having the courage of his convictions, but... well, he shouldn't have done what he did if he wasn't willing to pay the price.

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  93. If this is what the US does to its own soldiers who report crimes...

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  94. "...and the fact is that this boy betrayed the uniform."

    Well, the uniformed people watching PFC Manning might want to keep this in mind:

    "Ex-Argentine police officer accused of torture gets deported"

    Read more: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2010/12/18/105517/ex-argentine-police-officer-accused.html#ixzz18Zt3tV5i

    Though the U.S. seems to only be picking on immigrants who torture (unlike the top tier of the govt), things can change and will if I have anything to say about it!

    http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/12/18/1979043/ex-argentine-police-officer-accused.html

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  95. That is a horrible existence. It seems better than he deserves. I am surprised he has not been executed for treason.

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  96. Bring ALL Troops HomeDecember 19, 2010 at 12:26 PM

    " Mr. Manning took an oath to the US Army and broke it during war time. What he sowed, is what he is reaping. "

    1) He took an oath to UPHOLD THE CONSTITUTION.

    2) The U.S. is not "at war". The last U.S. war was declared in 1941 and is now over (except for the remainder of our occupation troops still in place). The “wars” we are fighting are illegal, criminal, immoral, UNCONSTITUTIONAL acts of aggression. If Manning has revealed information about these U.S. government CRIMES, then he was not only correct but duty-bound to do so.

    All soldiers should be so principled. PFC Manning deserves the thanks and support of all decent people.

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  97. There was a huge flaw in the system. Manning and Assange turned the spotlight on it. They saved us from a disaster of enormous proportions because of their actions. Because of them a dangerously flawed system will be fixed, should be fixed. Those with less passion and love of their country allowed the system to remain broken..didn't have the intuitive intelligence to recognize the flaws. We should be furious with the system that allowed such highly classified info to be so easily accessed. Manning and Assange
    knew this and it compelled them to act. They knew the consequences and acted in spite of them. IT WAS A HEROIC ACT by them who are true patriots. Of course the system and those who designed it with flaws are angry and unable to take responsibility for their carelessness.
    We the People know the truth that there is no perfection in our country and our systems. Change is a constant. There are men passionate enough, intelligent enough and brave enough to buck the systems that threaten to destroy us were it not for them. (Remember Watergate) Hurray for freedom fighters like Manning and Assange. HURRAY.

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  98. Please tell Bradley on your next visit that although he may feel alone - he is not. Millions of people all over the world pray for him and think about him. He is the bravest of the brave. He is my hero. Disclosing crimes is not a crime. Whether he did what he is accused of or not is irrelevant. He is being victimized by the worlds superpower. It's unworthy and unjust. He is in my thoughts 24/7 even here in far away Norway

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  99. Change will come. And the revolution will re adjust what is abhorrent.

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  100. Green Room/Hot Air: PFC Manning’s “Shameful” Treatment?
    http://hotair.com/archives/2010/12/19/pfc-mannings-shameful-treatment/

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  101. Having worked in a military confinement facility, I'd have to say that this is standard treatment for someone in his situation. He is kept safe, fed 3 meals a day, and has contact with the outside world. He is allowed to receive visitors, and allowed to watch TV and read magazines and books.

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  102. This guy is getting treated very well actually. Only a leftist nut would think otherwise.

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  103. most of the comments here are laughable. you know he's in the military right? hacking and releasing confidential military materiel, what do you think is going to happen? better save some of the handwringing for the lifetime he's going to spend behind bars, if he's lucky.

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  104. He leaked hundreds of thousands of secret government documents. He intentionally caused one of the most massive diplomatic incidents in US history. Treaties will not be signed. Allies will be made hesitant. Enemies will be made bold.

    While it will be impossible to explicitly cite the exact damages of this leak it will almost certainly cost lives to say nothing of billions of dollars in damages that will have to be paid for out of US tax dollars.

    So placed against that how would you gauge his crime? Consider that a hold up man that threatens no more then one life and perhaps steals 50 to 500 dollars can easily go away for five years. The fact that he wasn't violent is about as relevant is the fact that Bernie Madoff wasn't violent when he stole money from people. Let's be clear... Bradly is accused of and will be convicted of a very very very serious crime.

    Are his conditions worse then what the average person accused of this sort of crime has to contend with? He gets to watch cable tv all day... so color me unimpressed by these claims of abuse.

    You want to argue that he shouldn't be in jail at all or that he committed no crime? Fine. Do that. But don't pull the deceitful path of claiming that his conditions are inappropriate. It's passive aggressive arguments of that nature that render any meaningful discussion impossible.

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  105. This is what the Chinese do to anyone who doesn't tow the line.

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  106. The man put other's lives at risk by releasing secret diplomatic cables identifying our sources of intelligence information. 250,000 of them, and now very few people in or out of foreign governments will even talk to us, much less share sensitive information we could use to sve lives or prevent wars. It will take us a decade to repair the damage he has done. At a minimum, he will probably serve life, as well he should. Contrary to leftist opinion, 99% of the data released has been favorable to the US, but it's still secret, and he violated his military oath by releasing them.

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  107. He can have books & magazines. He can correspond with people. He has access to television and he can have visitors on the weekends and holidays. He gets to take a shower each day and to leave his room

    "The television stations are limited to the basic local stations."
    Is this what makes everyone think its cruel?

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  108. Manning's attorney has made it clear that his client is not being punished in the formal sense; Manning is being held in Prevention of Injury status, hence the reason he hasn't been issued bed sheets or anything else he could harm himself with. PFC Manning is not isolated as his guards keep him insight constantly. Clearly the military does not want to be blamed for any harm others, or Manning himself, might do to him. We can be sure that, if convicted and sentenced to prison, a term in Leavenworth will much less bearable for the lad.

    What is disturbing in all this, is the apparent slowness of the military to accuse Manning of an offense and lay charges accordingly.

    If the prosecutor can't move on this, then Manning ought to be released from custody and let the chips fall where they may. Alternatively, let Manning, on advice of counsel, choose whether to be let loose on his own recognizance, or accept military protection i.e., POI status.

    In summary, the US government/military should get on with it. By the way, David Coombes hasn't commented yet on visits or interactions PFC Manning is having with investigators, counsel and other officials – besides the guard staff that is.

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  109. Meh. Call me when he's waterboarded. Then I'll be outraged. Right now, there are children in this country receiving the same or worse, who haven't had trial yet, who aren't accused of treasonous acts.

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  110. Dang, the guy commits treason and he's living at club med. Can't beat that! I mean the poor guy gets to sleep 9 hours a night, it's been since high school that most of us got that much sleep. 6 hours a day of tv on the weekends. Good Lord!

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  111. what kind of food? any sunlight? any darkness at night? what kind of drugs must he take?

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  112. 'Dave' wrote-

    "Contrary to leftist opinion, 99% of the data released has been favorable to the US, but it's still secret, and he violated his military oath by releasing them."

    Bush and Cheney and Obama are all in violation of their oath to uphold the Constitution, the Geneva Convention, and the International Prohibition Against Torture, to which we are signatories. Are you willing to hold them to their oath as well?

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  113. Men are as evil as they can be and as good as they are forced to be. Currently there is no force to govern the thugs in powere Everyone posts anonymous because everyone is afraid of the gangster thugs that call themselves the government of America. These perverts are supposed to be our servants not our masters. He did not betray his country; the pervert thugs are not our country, they are the terrorists that rule our country. Our country is the common American person. He did not betray our country. He took an oath to defend our Constitution against foreign and domestic perverts. His actions defended the Constitution against domestic gangsters and thugs that hide behind the American Flag to slaughter and injure at their leisure the defenseless of the world's common people. He will be judged a brave soldier by eternity when he appears before his Creator. The government of USA is a sad evil joke. Sad to state that fear has paralyzed the moral backbone of the majority of the non-millionaire American folk. He is a hero even if he is alone and without a real friend in the world. Remember his world is a cage 6'x12'

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  114. I see censorship is alive and well on this liberal (as if) blog. Ah, the irony.

    So let me put it in a PC way so as not to offend the site masters: I believe the treatment of Manning is acceptable (and that he actually deserves far worse). I'll save my sympathy for others who are far more deserving.

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  115. ..."Anonymous said...

    Fairly harsh conditions considering he hasn't been found guilty of anything yet."

    He Hasn't even been CHARGED with anything. John Adams Spins in his GRAVE!!!!

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  116. Can someone please tell him about us? Tell him things people say to encourage him?

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  117. I support Bradley wholeheartedly, & I will pray for him to stay strong. With his strength of character & principles, I would be proud to have him as my son.

    Please tell Bradley to hang on. Is there anything we can do to help?

    I wish I could give him a hug.

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  118. I wonder what kind of conditions are imposed for guilty people? The military pretends they are caring for him with this POI treatment which is simply a disguise for torture and an attempt to break him so that he'll say whatever they want him to say. People are not stupid.

    This is a 22-year-old boy that the govt now intends to brutalize as if he is Osama bin Laden.

    Everybody has a breaking point. Torture someone long enough and he'll break in that he'll tell you what you want to hear.

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  119. Sounds pretty decent. He did sell out our country. How about giving America a break for providing you all with a country and services. That's coming from a Pakistani born naturalized and Proud American. Most of you don't even know how nasty the 'real' world can be. Ever have children beg you for money? Or a mother while she holds her infant? Have you had a truck bomb go off while you prepare for dinner. Poor Manning, I hope he gets justice if he is not guilty BUT above all Go America. It's time to stand by your nation, or leave.

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  120. Please tell him we're out here, and we're ashamed of our country. I am a veteran. I know the military. This is not what he's actually receiving but the sanitized version. I was a journalist in the US Navy and Army National Guard and sanitized military releases.

    He has not been found guilty of anything, he has not been charged, and yet he's receiving worse treatment than inmates at the county jail.

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  121. My Goodness! Everyone really has their knickers in a knot over this guy.

    The conditions under which he is being held are not very onerous. In any pre-trial detention there are some restriction of rights. I mean, the guy is under arrest, for God's sake! Anyone who is under arrest and has pre-trial detention will find the conditions less than what they are used to at home.

    The isolation aspect might be the hardest part of his current station in life, and is probably what has everyone so upset. But this is really for his own good, believe it or not.

    And no, he has not been charged with anything, but most criminals are detained while charges are being contempled and the case is being built against them. Really normal procedure just about everywhere.

    Finally, the defination of treason is specific and clear and is laid out in the Constitution. Using this defination, I doubt that he will be tried for treason or could ever be convicted given the law.

    As far as the articles of the UCMJ go, as my DI said long ago: "His ass is grass, and the law is a MF'ing lawnmower."

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  122. When the media turns a blind eye to the misdeeds of the government, people like Manning are our only hope as a nation. Maybe a few people will be inconvenienced by these cables. Maybe a few will even be killed. That's a small price to pay for an act that, had it occurred during the disinformation campaign before the Iraq war, could have saved tens of thousands of lives, both ours and the Iraqis. Sadly, these are the tradeoffs our tyranical corporate government is forcing us to make.


    The only mistake he made was bragging about it to that hacker. I'm sure he thought a hacker would never turn someone in to the government. Oops. That miscalculation is going to cause him a world of hurt.
    I don't think he realized just what he was in for if he were to be caught.
    Let's all send him the strength I know he'll need to stand tall and not buckle under government pressure to implicate Julian.

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  123. Back in 79 CE Cicero, in a trial of a corrupt governor, stated that "it is a crime to bind a Roman citizen, an abomination to flog him, to execute him like killing one's parents. To crucify him - who can describe it?" For crucifixion the way the Romans practiced it, was an extended torture-death by breaking and gradually weakening the body over days.

    What the US government is putting Pfc Bradley Manning is no less than a psychological crucifixion, for they are gradually weakening his mental and physical health. For what other than breaking him to obtain evidence to prosecute Assange? He has not yet even been put on trial!
    ____________________________

    Tafkao said... December 18, 2010 4:26 PM

    "Some Americans like to bask in comparisons between their empire and the Roman Empire.

    "I would say America's Caligula moment is almost upon her, concealing acts of inhumanity and illegality with ever more acts of inhumanity and illegality."

    Tafkao, I'm thinking that this government is going to bring back crucifixion, Roman-style. And it's not like the way it's described in Christian art, in popular Christian literature and in the movies. No, it was utter torture for the condemned and utterly hideous and obscene for the viewer. In reality, it was a a form of execution that would be better described not as crucifixion (thanks to Christianity) but as a combination of racking by suspension and impalement. (Yack!) X---D^<
    ____________________________

    Anonymous said... (December 18, 2010 7:57 PM)

    "...[T]heir [sic] are rouge nations ready to do harm to impose their way of life."

    And the most powerful rogue nation on Earth happens to go by the name, "The United States of America."

    Eat it! For we have a non-violent, perfectly legal revolution that needs to be accomplished in this country. And I DO mean revolution! The founding fathers gave us a means to do so, I suggest we use it.

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  124. Why is Bradley not allowed to exercise in his cell?

    Why is he not permitted to do press ups and sit ups?

    What harm would there be in allowing him to exercise, to keep his body in shape?

    It makes no sense, except if he is being deliberately punished.

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  125. Manning a hero? Let's be clear about this: he had no information that led him to suspect malfeasance on the part of the U.S. - he simply & indiscriminately handed over tens of thousands of classified documents to a man (Assange) who transparently shared Manning' anti-U.S. sentiments. Regarding his treatment: his cell is bigger than an officer's stateroom onboard ship - which, by the way, he doesn't have to share - and gets more cable channels, too. Excuse me if I don't shed a tear for this confused young man.

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  126. Somebody said he disclosed 'Top Secret' info, this is not true. AFAIK none of wikileaks is classified as 'Top Secret'. That's why most of it is just gossip.

    On the other hand, while wikileaks and the newspapers that publish the leaks have worked hard to remove names of individuals who might be under threat, I doubt Manning went through 250,000 files and did the same.

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  127. ivan ristovski,belgrade,serbiaDecember 20, 2010 at 8:07 AM

    shame on you hellary

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  128. Welcome to the new Soviet Union. Dissenters and whistleblowers will be treated to the harshest possible detention while awaiting show trial. An example will be made of anyone who dares challenge the State's inalienable right to do whatever it wants in absolute secrecy. Troublemakers will be "persuaded" to recant and to turn in their allies.

    Have a nice day.

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  129. @p chase: What you just wrote is completely inaccurate, to say the least. The video of the 2007 helicopter attack alone was grounds for Manning to blow the whistle: aerial assault on totally unarmed noncombatants coming to the aid of the wounded. This is a war crime by any definition out there. And his writings confirm that his motivation was because he thought this was illegal.

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  130. If this doesn't make people question the motives of government officials in general and military officials in particular, then there isn't much hope left for humanity.

    This is absolutely and unequivocally torture. This is the kind abhorrent treatment of political prisoners that bloody revolutions are fought over.

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  131. Manning is an American hero. He is also a world hero.

    Manning's treatment should give all civilized societies pause before allowing prisoners to be extradited here. Sad to say, we, Americans, are torturers.

    This treatment is meant to dehumanize. But not just Manning, this deliberate regime also dehumanizes the guards.

    The Marines, the few, the proud, the torturers.

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  132. I can't believe all the crying and whimpering on in these comments. He's in jail, it's not suppose to be fun. You people lead such sheltered lives that any exposure to reality makes you convulse in horror.

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  133. Words fail me, the poor man has not been even convicted!
    I know, everybody else has pointed this out, but . I think it needs repeating, soon and often!

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  134. Sounds like the military.

    If you step outta line...your @$$ is grass!

    been there, done that :(

    stay strong brutha.

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  135. Absolutely despicable! This is purely punitive, and being done with someone who has not been convicted of any crime whatsoever. Stalin would be proud of the US Army's handling of this case.

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  136. Just a reminder to you liberals: This is happening on OBAMA's watch! Is this the HOPE we believed in?

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  137. The world is full of Fluffy Bunnies and soft Kittens. :)

    Please, let everybody out of all the jails if they just promise to be good.

    We don't need an Army. If we are nice to other Countries, they will be nice back to us.

    I really wish the world was like this, but it's not. Open your eyes!!

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  138. President Obama needs to be impeached for this horrid action against a true hero!

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  139. This bad boy is going to be in jail for a loooong time - serves him right too.
    He deliberately broke his vows, he deliberately broke laws that he knew would be enforced, and he advertised it. No time to start whining now - let him be the martyr he so desperately wants to be, for the rest of his natural life.

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  140. But but but Jullian Assabnge embarrassed America so PFC Bradley Manning must suffer!

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  141. Blatantly unconstitutional cruel and unusual punishment, anyone? (No, the Constitution doesn't make any exception for the military, anticipating what many post-constitutionalist would-be tyrants would try to argue.) And for someone not yet even convicted of anything?

    Also, notice the hypocrisy of the liberal Democrats who would be complaining about this bitterly if it was being done under a Republican president. What a foul and beknighted regime has become the United States.

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  142. laura@batcave.va.usaDecember 21, 2010 at 3:36 PM

    This is excerpted from a journal article by Dr Bruce Grassian, a Harvard-trained psychiatrist and expert on the deleterious effects of solitary confinement. He describes conditions similar to those Bradley Manning has endured the last seven months as a prisoner of conscience at Quantico. Here's a quote:

    "The restriction of environmental stimulation and social isolation associated with confinement in solitary are strikingly toxic to mental functioning, producing a stuporous condition associated with perceptual and cognitive impairment and affective disturbances... But even those inmates who are more psychologically resilient inevitably suffer severe psychological pain as a result of such confinement, >>>>> especially when the confinement is prolonged, and especially when the individual experiences this confinement as being the product of an arbitrary exercise of power and intimidation. Moreover, the harm caused by such confinement may result in prolonged or permanent psychiatric disability, including impairments which may seriously reduce the inmate's capacity to reintegrate into the broader community upon release from prison."

    How convenient for corrupt officials that many young people subjected to this and other forms of torture die before their time, in "accidents," and from "suicides" and "drug overdoses." There's a great deal more to the story, but the authorities torturing Bradley don't want the public to learn the truth. If all of the pertinent facts in this situation were admitted in an honest court, it would be clear that Bradley Manning committed no crimes and that the U.S. military and government are the worst kind of traitors. No matter what they do to Bradley, or to Julian Assange if they get their bloody hands on him, the truth will out and they're going to look very bad, worse than they do now. They're only prolonging the inevitable. What frightfully stupid, obtuse people these are. I'd be interested to find out whether it's learned or genetic. I suspect the latter.

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  143. @jeremy w:

    Of course jail's not supposed to be fun! But neither is it supposed to be cruel and unusual punishment, which is exactly what Brian Manning is being put through, Prevention of Injury Watch notwithstanding (I think that's just an excuse). Article 13 of the UCMJ, equivalent to Amendment VIII of the Constitution, states that the conditions of his confinement must not exceeed that required to ensure presence at his trial. Which means he could have been put under house arrest at his aunt's house in Potomac, MD with an ankle bracelet and everything would have been fine.

    Do they turn out the lights in his cell when he lays down to sleep? I doubt it.

    Do they let him have any sunlight? I doubt it.

    People need darkness at night, sunlight at day, and the ability to communicate with his peers! Deprive that for an extended period of time and you're inflicting cruel and unusual punishment worthy of the old Soviet Union's KGB.

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  144. @mike g.

    Exactly. Obama sold us a bill of goods. The media caught him in a lie over NAFTA in March 2008 and I realised this man should be judged by the content of his character!!! Instead we ended up having to vote for him (some of us, like me, voting for the lesser of two evils with our eyes wide open) over John Sidney McCain and Sarah Palin. I thought McCain would surely die in office because of the stress and Palin would be an unalloyed disaster compared to Obama. Now I'm not so sure.

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  145. Mannings defense has it wrong.

    Though isolation is never good for social beings.

    Manning is still a detainee so the verdict is still out what will happen to him.

    If manning has been abused, case delayed, over-detained, on an incorrect restriction etc. those things will support him in court.

    In general population, its really no better. he will have to share the atmosphere with 0-24 disgruntles people, people trying trying to use him inorder to help their cases, undercovers, constent cleaning chores, going to the restroom in front of others, possible fights, constent inspections, regimented movements, and possible diciplinary issues. The worst are the udercovers posing as detainees and people whom either will mine manning for information or try to get him in trouble. Those things help the prosecution.

    peole 4get that Quantico brig has Desegregation II which is far more controlled and isolated than manning is. At the same time, Quantico Brig is the headquartes of the Marines, marine OCS, FBI academy, DEA, Presidential guard, DSS, and many many agencies working in tandum. Isolation is the best thing to manning during Pre-trial confinement.

    When he is prosecuted, which he will be because of the scrutiny/publicity, then he can interact (with caution) at whatever brig he is sent.

    His military lawyer seems to be naive of the true nature of Quantico. :)

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  146. Which country is performing this inhumane treatment on someone who supposedly is innocent until proven guilty? Oh that's right, the land of the free...

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  147. Thank your very much for sharing this. I consider this torture - nothing more I need to add.

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  148. How sad that our liberties are constantly being taken away by our totalitarian state. Where is the statment--you are innocent until proven guilty!! I'm sure they want him to go after Assage, even if he lies. Are we ever going to take back our country from the supposed liberals that we elected--namely Obama and company. We need more than 2 parties. Let's copy the people in Europe, where they have a multi party system.

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  149. Anonymous said... December 21, 2010 2:14 PM

    "Mannings defense has it wrong.

    "Though isolation is never good for social beings.

    "Manning is still a detainee so the verdict is still out what will happen to him....

    "Isolation is the best thing to manning during Pre-trial confinement."

    If that be the case,then the authorities should pursue house arrest with a GPS bracelet round his ankle at his aunt's house in Potomac, MD. It's not that far away, only 20-30 miles.

    And what's the point of isolation for the prevention of injury when the immense psychological harm it does to people will render him unable to defend himself or even have the presence of mind at his trial? Glenn Greenwald reports that a friend of his from Boston, David House,"describes palpable changes in Manning's physical appearance and behavior just over the course of the several months that he's been visiting him." And Mr. Greenwald also reports that Lt. Brian Villiard, a Quantico Brig official, has been detained as a " 'Maximum Custody Detainee,' the highest and most repressive level of military detention." So ikt looks like he IS in Desegregation II as you put it.

    So is this how they treat a military whistleblower in the military now? To subject him to punishment so cruel and unusual that his brain is destroyed, his soul and spirit crushed and his personality erased? I thought only evil empires like the extinct Soviet Union prior to Gorbachev did this sort of thing!

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  150. Forgot, Glenn Greenwald's article here: http://www.salon.com/news/opinion/glenn_greenwald/2010/12/14/manning/index.html

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  151. How is he a hero? Wake the hell up people!

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  152. This is ridiculous. I came to live my "American Dream", coming from - I realize now- a truly free country, but now I'm starting to doubt my decision. I am hopeful there is still at least 50% of Americans that have the brains to see this country is going the wrong way. I do truly think Manning is a hero and so is Assange. I hope that through all the attention they'll give Manning a fair trial, if they don't break him before that time, and that Assange will never get into the hands of American government. I actually feel repression myself, as I fear that me posting publicly about Assange or Manning could compromise myself, since i just obtained a green card and they already treated my husband like half a terrorist in the process of trying to get it, so they could potentially take it away again if we do not fit into American society, if we don't agree with the politics here?? Who can assure me that I do NOT have be afraid??

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  153. THE TREATMENT this POOR PVT MANNING is getting is despicable. SO IS OUR GOVT!! PRAY FOR HIM!!

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  154. I find it very depressing to think that we, a supposedly democratic country would torture a young man who is innocent (innocent until proven guilty) for being brave enough to expose injustices, lies and only want transparency. I believe that the great founders of this country would consider PFC Mannig to be a patriotic hero! It is discouraging to see how low we have sunk. This young man is courageous and his spirit, unlike those of his tormentors, is filled with light and integrity. I think it is horrific and utterly inhumane to treat anyone, and especially an innocent American citizen this way ..... and to think that his testimony would be worth anything after such torture is insane.

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  155. As a former government employee/diplomat, I cannot imagine representing my country now and explaining this monstrous treatment to foreigners, particularly while extolling the virtues of the American political system as we are expected to do.

    What happened to my country? Is the Obama administration trying to do to this man what the Bush administration did to Jose Padilla - turn him into a vegetable? What happened to our "constitutional lawyer" in the presidency?

    The price of Empire.

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  156. Manning has not yet been convicted of any crime but is being tortured by the Marines. Isolation on this scale is torture which may destroy Manning's mind before he even comes to trial. See:
    http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2009/03/30/090330fa_fact_gawande

    Moreover, Manning is not a spy or a traitor, he's a whistle-blower. And we put him in our very own Abu Ghraib. I ashamed at the depths to which we in America are sinking.

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  157. Pfc. Bradley Manning swore an oath affirming specific conditions and requirements to protect secrecy as part of his military and federal service to the United States and her public.

    I strongly believe that, regardless of the actual content of that leaked material, that Pfc. Manning violated his oath, disavowed his oath of confidence to the government and the American citizens that constitute it, and thus committed an act of treason. Furthermore, his violations of military codes of conduct are obvious, unambiguous, and require punishment.

    Manning is not a whistleblower. None of the released communiques reveal any criminal acts or constitutional violations. The materal is tawdry, occasionally controversial, but otherwise meaningless. Policy will not change as a result of the leak.

    Manning deserves prosecution and imprisonment. Assange and other functionary members of his organization deserve the same.

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  158. This is a lot of BS!

    Oh is he OK?

    Oh they are so nice with him!

    Ya right! The are torturing him!

    STOP THAT RIGHT NOW!

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  159. Good Grief! This is a prison, not a babysitting business. He is not being raped, beaten, verbally abused, etc. WHICH IS WHAT WOULD HAPPEN TO HIM in a normal prison environment. Hopefully, he is going to have or is having some psychological treatment and testing to verify his ability to stand trial. Do you people understand that this man is suicidal and was before his arrest? Get a grip. If he is the guilty party he has betrayed your trust and mine and the safety of all of us. He is neither a hero nor some evil antihero, but a kid with mental issues (and I do not mean his sexual orientation) who should never have been given access to a Top Secret clearance. There is plenty of blame to go around. He will live to be tried and we will find out what happened then. And hopefully the blame will be properly distributed around.

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  160. Quantico = Guantanamo

    Manning should be brought to trial ASAP and allowed to defend himself. It should be a trial open to international human rights observers and he should be convicted beyond any reasonable doubt with solid evidence.

    If, under these conditions, he is condemned of an offense, then I will accept that. In the meantime, his situation is UNACCEPTABLE.

    Regardless of the outcome, I wish him strength to get through it.

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  161. I hope he gets a pardon.

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  162. I am sorry folks but he ADMITTED to releasing Classified information to unauthorized individuals which is an admission of GUILT. That is an automatic admission of guilt and punishable under the UCMJ. It seems a lot of you feel like you could save every soldier that screws up under this law, but the sad truth is you won't because its not in your POLITICAL agenda.
    I might point out where mister JA is from and I am looking for leaks from his country......still waiting and I know for damn sure they are not squeaky clean.
    Any way back to the point at hand, PFC Bigmouth volunteered, and willingly broke the law. Wikileaks, his tons of supporters, and the rest of the folks that feel like he is being wronged need to look up the REAL contract soldiers sign and then read the ENTIRE UCMJ before saying anything else that makes you look like an idiot!

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  163. People,

    Those of you who consider this torture have lost all manners of perspective.

    He's given access to food, water, books, magazines, visitors and moderate exercise.

    Torture? you people have lost your minds. A day in a high security quarter of a prison in California, Alabama or Paris (lookup Fleury Merogis on the inter tubes if you're interested) is far far worse than what the conditions Mr Manning is being held under.

    Mixing him with the general prison population where he would undoubtedly shanked and killed by someone who considers his a traitor - now that would be torture.

    For those of you bringing up Habeas Corpus: he's allowed visitors: It's not an issue. Everyone knows where he is, and how's being kept.

    Right to a speedy trial: he will have one. He's a US citizen and a member of the military. He will be tried by a court martial. For those interested in how that works, read Wikipedia or watch A Few Good Men. It's fair, and the juries are made up of honest, good people.

    He will go away for a long time, which he amply deserves.

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  164. The inhumane and torturous treatment of Bradley Manning is disgusting and an outrage!!! I plan to call my state representatives every day and voice how I feel until Bradley is treated fairly!!!!!!!
    Hang in there Bradley and know that there are people fighting for you!!!!!!!!!!

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  165. He has been charged and this is lawful pretrial confinement. Unlike a civilian, he retains full pay and benefits while in the brig. He has it far better than any comparably situated civilian so let's ease up on the hysteria people.

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  166. This guy is a hero. He amply deserves all the support we can give.

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  167. He should be allowed to take a nap if he wants during the day.
    I bet the guards do wake him up every 5 minutes to "check on him" during the night. Thus getting no sleep.
    Eventually the truth will come out concerning his incarceration.
    He's a whistleblower!
    He's NOT one of the bad guys!
    There is a difference!

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  168. Let Bradley know that there are people all over the world who are thinking of him and trying to act to help him. He is only on his own, not alone.
    Dadadad, England

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  169. "JEREMY W. said...
    ...He's in jail, it's not suppose to be fun. You people lead such sheltered lives that any exposure to reality makes you convulse in horror."
    Jeremy, I think you're confusing this man with a convicted criminal. Manning has been held in these conditions, without trial, for seven months. The basis of our freedom is due process. To know how you should feel about this you only have to ask yourself, "Would I want it to be possible for authorities to do this to me or my family?" If you assume he is guilty and thus deserves the treatment he is receiving, then you don't share the same beliefs as those who wrote our constitution and the thousands more who suffered and died to make it binding. You also accept the scenario in which I can take away your freedom for as long as I want, before an independent jury can decide if I have any just cause, if I only had the power and the motive to do so. But, of course he's guilty. Isn't he? Blind trust of someone else's accusations will allow you to sign off on another's captivity, but won't allow you to keep your freedom for very long.
    Joel M.

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  170. anyone who thinks up schemes like this should be held like this

    this is not human
    this is torture

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  171. Yawn. The guy released a quarter of a million classified documents with NO regard to the consequences others trying to help America might suffer (including death). If he had released the single video of civilians being killed (a la helo gunfire) you could argue it was because of some noble stand against violence. He didn't. He wanted to be "cool" because in real life he is a "Walter Mitty" daydreaming about things he never was or will be. The agonizing by most on this site is pathetic. Enjoy the freedoms this country gives you while castigating those who provide it. The naturalized Pakastani was right. You know nothing of real torture in the world. I spent 29 years serving on the "fringes of the Roman empire." What it did was cement in me just how great our country is and all it offers and provides to its citizens...in spite of its warts. Most of you spend your times drinking lattes and deciding how screwed up America is compared to everywhere else. You have done nothing to contribute to the safety and security of your lives...no, have contributed nothing meaningful to anyone except yourselves. Go back to your little groups of self congratulatory, "head-in-the-clouds" losers and feed the unicorns and scratch all the puppies who pee on your rug.

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  172. I am truly sorry that this society I am a part of is treating PFC Manning in this way. It is sickening that we have devolved to this. Please let him know just how many of us are concerned and taking action. I am writing congress and the president today. Aside from the retribution against Mr. Manning, the purpose of this is to serve as a PSA for the all of us.

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  173. It really sickens me at the bleeding heart liberals that are posting crap like "inhumane treatement, blah, blah, blah," this pathetic piece of crap should be executed...point frickin blank...he admitted his guilt, even bragging...cut the crap send him back to Iraq or Afghanistan and turn him over to the enemey, thats what he is!

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  174. Meanwhile, real war criminals and other enemies of the State lead lives of Riley, even in federal prison; a young military man languishes without trial, without hope, in deplorable conditions imposed by a government that deserves to be exposed for what it really is...a shameful bunch of greedy bigots with no sense of honor or justice when dealing with other countries or its own citizenry.

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  175. NONE ARE SO BRAVE AS THE ANONYMOUS.

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  176. Please let Bradley know he has friends all over the world, including the UK. It is not widely known here that he holds Dual Citizenship and I am petitioning my MP and other organisations here to take an interest.

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  177. What the United States is doing to Bradley Manning, in our names, disgusts me. I don't have the words to adequately express my disappointment in those who actually run the United States of America. http://dangerousintersection.org/2010/12/23/not-torture-torture/

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  178. I think of the lives that could of been saved if one Bradley Manning would have exposed to the world what our government made up about the Gulf of Tomkin and prevented the Vietnam war. Bradley Manning is the role model I want my son to follow. Not the cowardly George Bush and Barack Obama wrapped in the flag capitalist patriotism. Stand tall Bradley we are with you!

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  179. Pedophiles and terrorists are treated 100X better than PFC Manning; such a damn shame.

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  180. I do not understand why people are so surprised at his treatment, the USA have been world leaders in torture for decades. The CIA trained the most blood thirsty torturers in South America, just ask my friend Adelgonda. In the late 90's aged 19 she was arrested & taken to a naval base, then to a Chilean navy ship where she was tortured for three weeks, used as nothing more than an instructional mannequin as American "advisors" taught new torturers. She is safe now living here in Holland but only in her 40s she is crippled by the damage to joints, she was never able to have children due to the intimate internal injuries inflicted on her. She still freezes any time she hears an american voice in the street.

    I am sure in their torture of young Mr Manning they will not leave any physical scars on him but then they do not need to do they.

    My thoughts are with him, and I will continue to write to anyone, everyone I can to raise awareness. Sadly in the meantime the security apparatus of the USA will continue to grow unchecked due to the apathy or stupidity of the majority.

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  181. What is happening to U.S.A. of America, aren't we in the land of the free? Punishing a hero that is willing to tell the Truth? How can this be possible? Where are the civil rights? Please, anybody could explain this to me and the rest of this Nation, based upon the Inspired Constitution by God. Having incarcerated this way an innocent hero, how do we call this when another nation does it? I think every free nation call this TORTURE. What a shame, where are the defenders of Liberty, please send out letters to President Obama, and and demand his immediate release, everybody that has a conscious thinking and believe in God. HE (GOD) is probably very mad and if this nation keep on abusing and killing innocent people is going to pay a very high price when God loose his PATIENCE and protection of this blessed LAND.

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  182. If one doesn't possess a robot morality, one should not willingly become part of the US Military-Industrial Complex. It's a job and a living, sure, but one sells his soul when he takes it on. It's as simple as that.

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  183. The US at present has a White House Office Holder and nominal Commander-in-Chief of its military who has yet to prove his eligibility to hold the office. This Usurper has had far greater access to top-level classfied material than this soldier and has not, IN FACT, been shown to be qualified to receive such material and dispose of it has he has undoubtedly done. Among many other flaws, the United States is a system of double standards. Anyone who feels morally justified in serving in this country's military should, perhaps, do some soul searching and reconsider, because his future commander-in-chief just may be a complete fraud, meaning that the orders you may be acting up are simply illegal. Of course, maybe it doesn't matter. Less and less seems to these days.

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  184. http://act.ly/2w7
    Please, please sign this petition to let President Obama know that we all want answers to the questions you are asking. He needs to know that we care, that we are all watching, and that we are not tolerating crimes against innocent people to protect those who really are guilty of committing crimes. Please sign to let him know: http://act.ly/2w7

    Thank you for writing this article, David.
    ~Dagi

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  185. Active Associate Member, Vets For PeaceDecember 24, 2010 at 2:24 AM

    Anyone who is (justifiably) appalled by the conditions of confinement of Bradley Manning should join any number of organizations working on his case. You don't have to be a veteran, you can be an ally/associate member of: Veterans for Peace, Iraq Veterans Against the War, Courage to Resist, Military Families Speak Out, Citizen-Soldier Alliance, etc.

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  186. Active Associate Member, Vets For PeaceDecember 24, 2010 at 2:47 AM

    Those who want to help PFC Manning should join any number of organizations who are actively advocating for him. You don't have to be a veteran, you can be an ally/associate member of:
    Veterans For Peace, Iraq Veterans Against the War, Courage to Resist, Military Families Speak Out, Citizen-Soldier Alliance, etc.

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  187. This person used the excuse that he had a fight with his boy friend, doesn't sound completely innocent to me. If he is found guilty of treason, which to me is what he is accused of, he could be shot, if I'm not mistaken, these conditions may sound good to him then. I'm no fan of Obama and I found the Lockerbee bomber information truly upsetting, but this man is accused of a horrific crime folks, and if he is guilty, most of us think he should be made an example of for the next person who has a fight with their boy friend.

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  188. This is outrageous and our PRESIDENT should intervene, whether publicly or as Commander in Chief in private, and make this STOP. This is extreme psychological torture. A human is not capable of responding to such limits and regimentation -- not to mention lack of any daily continuity of contact with people or even reading material, with exercise prohibited -- all the way down to being asked if he's OK EVERY FIVE MINUTES and required to give an audible response! -- What is wrong with these people? What hateful, vengeful individuals came up with these incredibly creative and cruel protocols. I am ashamed of the people who are responsible for this and they should be ashamed of themselves. The vice-president of our country had the name of a legitimate covert agent revealed for crass political gain, and the past administration lied to take us to WAR and they are treated as honored guests and heroes around this country. We don't even know if this boy did what he's accused of -- he has not even been brought to trial. And he's treated like this for supposedly releasing information that is NOT as secret as the names of our covert agents! He's being persecuted as a lesson to others -- which is obscene, in that he has yet to be brought before a judge or tribunal. This stinks to the heavens. And I'll put my name on this opinion. Pat Goudey O'Brien!

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  189. I think is violating all of our laws. A person deserves to go to trial. A judge and jury of his peers should judge him. What gives the military the right to sentence him of this treatment? All they are doing is trying to cover up things they were doing wrong. This is a disgrace. I and my fellow american citizens will support Manning. I am going to get the word out to as many people as I can.How come President Nixon and I use that word lightly, not sitting beside Manning in jail. He of all people committed crimes to ALL OF AMERICA, more than Manning. He should get the same treatment. You are not being fair. Government officials are the worst criminals because all you do is lie to us.Cover up what you want and use the little guys to cover up the stuff you do wrong.I totally support Manning. Justice for one and justice for all.

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  190. when government is beaking basic human laws and laws of our land like holding brandley manning without his day in court as of yet what can we the people do about this i really want to demand he be released on bail until trial

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  191. Bradley Manning should be released and be given a medal of honour for his heroic deed and the instigators/perpetrators of these bloody wars--Donald Rumsfeld, Paul Wolfowits, G.W.Bush, D. Cheney-- should be thrown in prison, instead!

    Merry Christmas Bradley!

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  192. Holding someone prior to a trial is not against the law...

    Manning should not be released, nor receive a medal of honor. His deed was not heroic. There were legal avenues for him to pass the information without illegally giving out classified material. If his CO says, "Be quiet" you go above him until you find the right answer.

    You have a difficult case ahead of you, Mr. Coombs. I wish you the best of luck, and hope your client receives the justice his actions require.

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  193. What's the matter with Obama? He is president and can direct that Manning be treated better. Bradley Manning has not even been convicted of any crime; so how can this treatment be considered Constitutional?

    Even Saddam Hussein was allowed to have conversations with his guards.

    The worst serial murderers who have been convicted of their crimes are treated better than this.

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  194. We are rapidly becoming a nation NOT of laws but of lawless and vindictive men.

    It's interesting and disgusting that our current president was advertised to us as a Constitutional professor (er, lecturer), but he seems to hate the Constitution and appears to be doing all he can to ignore its provisions.

    This treatment of Bradley Manning is cruel and inhuman punishment, and Manning has not even been convicted of any crime.

    Obama is more lawless even than George W. Bush and is certainly more lawless than Bradley Manning.

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  195. This is what happens when we the people are to distracted by the technology that our government releases to keep us blind to what they are really doing. While they are "fighting terrorism" we the people are to worried about what the newest video game is or what the newest Iphone is capable of. We the people need to fucking wake up and revolt against our so called "leaders" and take control over this country like we did against Britain so many years ago.

    My best wishes to brad, nobody deserves the treatment he is being put through.(except the inhumane people putting him through all this) Especially when all he was doing was trying to keep the public informed on what our corrupt government is doing.

    Stay strong marine. You are not alone in this cold, heartless,and greed driven world.

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  196. Todo mi apoyo desde Canarias (Spain)

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  197. This is deplorable treatment. I stand by him and hope that he if released soon.
    I live near Wichita Ks where on of the men in the video lives and I got to hear him speak. He stands by Manning and called him a hero. He carried one of the children from the vehicle to the humvee. When he went for help for the psychological problems he had because of that experience he was belittled by his command and denied treatment. He is curently with Iraq vets for peace.
    When I was in the reserves before I became a peace activist, the contract I signed basically said that I was property of the US government. I believe that's why soldiers cannot sue the government for any injuries incured during their time of servce. And it's very hard to punish anyone for abuse. It is estimated that one in three women serving in the armed forces is raped by fellow soldiers and very seldom punished.

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  198. Folks,
    Most of you are obviously unaware of the Military Justice System. I have personally visited this facility a few times (many years ago) performing the required weekly visit to a young sailor detained there when I was a very junior officer.

    The conditions described appear to be like what I saw for everyone I was able to see during my short visits. Marine Brig Quantico is no fun for sure, but neither are the Very professional Marine Guards breaking any rules nor deliberately harrassing their "guests."

    Actions have consequences, and (Army) PFC Manning is learning this the hard way. Every military has rules. FYI the American "legal" rules for our military as enacted into law in the Uniform Code of Military Justice are fairly straightforward and do indeed provide for both due process and a real genuine opportunity for a proper honest hearing.

    I have also served as a member on three Courts Martial over the years, and I assure you PFC will be shown due process, and the verdict at his "trail" will depend only on:
    - the facts of the case as determined at the Court Martial
    - the required elements of proof, as explicitly described in the UCMJ
    - the guidance of the presiding JAG officer.


    Respectfully,
    Mike
    CAPT, USN (RC) Ret.

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  199. Mike, I appreciate what you said. However, Manning's been put on a Protection of Injury watch. That watch, I am firmly convinced, has been at least six-and-a-half months too long. I have seen David House report on MSNBC that Manning's physical and mental health are declining because of this! Even if done with the best of intentions, what they are doing to him is no less than torture! Someone needs to contact the Psych Eval Team and the Inspector General over this. Coombs may have lobbied the IG already, I don't know. It may be that the Team are under pressure from the White House to keep him under POI. I have no proof, but as a shamed and disenchanted Obama voter, I wouldn't put it past them... I cannot trust Obama as far as I can throw him!

    And now Fox News is lying about Manning's solitary confinement and justifying it. Odious on their part!

    http://ifpeakoilwerenoobject.blogspot.com/2010/12/everything-is-oppositeland-at-fox-news.html

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