04 March 2011

PFC Manning Stripped Naked Again

PFC Manning was forced to strip naked in his cell again last night.  As with the previous evening, Quantico Brig guards required him to surrender all of his clothing.  PFC Manning then walked back to his bed, and spent the next seven hours in humiliation. 

The decision to require him to be stripped of all clothing was made by the Brig commander, Chief Warrant Officer-2 Denise Barnes.  According to First Lieutenant Brian Villard, a Marine spokesman, the decision was "not punitive" and done in accordance with Brig rules.  There can be no conceivable justification for requiring a soldier to surrender all his clothing, remain naked in his cell for seven hours, and then stand at attention the subsequent morning.  This treatment is even more degrading considering that PFC Manning is being monitored -- both by direct observation and by video -- at all times. The defense was informed by Brig officials that the decision to strip PFC Manning of all his clothing was made without consulting any of the Brig's mental health providers.

On Wednesday, the government filed its response to the defense's Article 138 complaint concerning PFC Manning's confinement conditions.  The preliminary decision made by the government was to deny PFC Manning's request to be removed from Maximum custody and from Prevention of Injury (POI) watch.  The defense now has ten days to file a rebuttal to this determination.  After submitting the rebuttal, the matter will go back to the Quantico Base Commander, Colonel Daniel J. Choike, for his review.  Once complete, he will forward the report to the Secretary of the Navy for final review. 

50 comments:

  1. This is no way to treat a soldier who's only offence was to be offended by injustice.

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  2. Compliments to the USA...is this the way we wont to show to Arabic country?Is this our occidental democracy?

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  3. PFC Manning is the hero we should all aspire to be. How can Obama and Clinton threaten Gaddafi with the ICC when they are refusing to investigate the war crimes exposed by PFC Manning?! The blatant hypocrisy and double standards are doing yet more damage to the US's already battered reputation. "Land of the free", indeed!

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  4. So they're trying to kill him, basically.

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  5. I'd like to get a copy of the rules of the brig...can you request they post them somewhere online? I think it would be good to know what specific things could under their rules justify such things...I think this may be a case of the rules are broken...or there may be some wilfull bending of them...the public has the right to know...

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  6. So this is what US-style emocracy looks like. Time to let the fifty states each go its own way. But if the central government were to have its way, we'd have economic, political and religious tyranny for a hundred years. That's about the maximum life expectancy of a police state.

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  7. Lt. Col. Coombs,

    I believe this is the first we've heard of Manning being under video surveillance. Does that mean a camera is trained on his cell at all times? If so, are they still making him respond verbally every five minutes?

    Also, the Marine Corp. has said it can't comment on why Manning's clothes were taken away without violating Manning's privacy. Do you know what that's about? Had Manning made any statements to the guards, a visitor or other detainees indicating he might harm himself?

    Finally, is your Article 138 complaint, or the government's response, a matter of public record? If so, do you know how one might obtain a copy?

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  8. Trampas... regret to inform you they may already have killed him. Prolonged solitary confinement atrophies the mind, often permanently. Dr Stuart Grassian has written a great article describing the effects; it can be found on prisoncommision.org

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  9. check out this link for some of the rules : http://1.usa.gov/dW0OkB

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  10. It is evident that they are playing with the interstices of the law to make him suffer. The hatred against him for the humiliations suffered by the US hegemon is so huge, that they don't have any other way to take revenge than to try to annihilate his humanity.

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  11. Article 138 is a total waste of paper and soldiers' time. I have yet to see an actual commander have their authority, no matter how wrong, brought into any sort of inquiry.

    Just my $.02 worth.

    No retaliation, yeah right.

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  12. Chronic Democrats wonder why other left wingers are angry at them.

    This is not happening on George Bush's watch. People vote Democrats into office and claim that this is the only power they have -- to try to keep Republicans out of office. And yet, they play cheerleaders, give volunteer time and money to these politicians that they claim to not really want at all. And their only option is to approve all this ? Maybe we need a revolution in America if we have been so divested of any say over what our employees in government do.

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  13. Is there any possibility that Manning can sue the USG for this treatment? Has this been considered?

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  14. Hey look everyone, it's Kevin Poulsen, friend of government informant Adrian Lamo and one of the only people on Earth in possession of the full Manning-Lamo chat transcripts.

    Kevin, any plans to engage in real journalism anytime soon? Maybe the kind that involves releasing information instead of concealing it?

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  15. MESSAGE TO BRAD

    'And do not for one moment be intimidated in anything by your adversaries, for such constancy is a clear sign and demonstration to them of their impending collapse but a sure token of your deliverance, and that from God'
    Philippians 1.28

    Please understand that your suffering is not wasted; that it exposes the bankruptcy of the forces that oppose you and demonstrates to 'even a-little-bit-right-minded' people (who may convince themselves that the charges against you are just) that there is no moral uprightness in the position of the authorities tormenting you.

    Brad, these latest abuses are being shouted to the world (I am in the UK and am forwarding them to all contacts) and, you know this soooo tips the balance against those who are focusing their hatred upon you, and I believe it will gain you many more supporters.

    You are a DIAMOND, Son! as we say in England.
    A million blessings xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    COURAGE, BELOVED BROTHER - we are standing with you day and night in our prayers, our hearts and our activism

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  16. Did PFC Manning do that of which he is accused? I know not.

    President Obama, however, by continuing to permit such a relentless regime of aggravated pre-trial punishment, clearly thinks he did. Let us suppose the President & his administration are right:

    The ordinary people of Tunisia have toppled a despot as a consequence of known corruption unexpectedly confirmed to them in old US diplomatic cables suddenly made public. Now, for the first time ever, they have some hope of democracy. Let us assume President Obama is right:

    The consequences did not stop in Tunisia. They spread to Egypt, & then further. Were it not for one lone US soldier, the Gaddafis & the Mubaraks would still be wielding the electrodes unimpeded. Let us assume the President is right:

    It would take immense courage on the part of any ordinary fighting man confronted with evidence of otherwise unidentified war crimes or corruption to act consistent with the principles of international law. Let us assume the President is right:

    As a consequence of such courage, we see millions all over the Middle East prompted, astonishingly, to throw off their State torturers. Whole nations now have in sight the possibility of democracy. The leader of the free world's reward to the whistleblower?

    It appears PFC Manning is subjected, morning, noon & night, to, err . . . torture.

    Is the President right?

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  17. Hallo David Coombs

    ich bin sehr traurig über solche Vorgehensweise.
    Ich bitte Sie, tun Sie alles, um diesem anständigen jungen Menschen zu helfen.

    Ich bete für Ihn.

    Heike aus Deutschland

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  18. I find it incredible that a female Warrant Officer is requiring a male prisoner to be naked. Shades of Abu Ghurab.

    If the reverse occurred the screams of the feminists would drown out what little common sense there is left in the military.

    This situation is an outrage. Whats next for a man un-condemned? Bread and water? Lashes?

    History is filled with men punished outside of justice.

    No one wins when freedom fails,
    The best men rot in filthy jails,
    And those who cried "appease, appease",
    Are hanged by the ones they tried to please.

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  19. What a strange and wonderful life. Im sure he didn't realize what his 'sacrifice' would be. He is in my thoughts and I consider him a TRUE hero. I sincerely hope that you can find some actual justice for a friend, but I also realize that you face behemoth.

    Frankly it should be PFC Manning's face as the poster boy for freedom rather than the douchebag, Assange's.

    If there is a God let him shine upon you.

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  20. Mr. Coombs,

    Thank you very much for zealously providing legal counsel for PFC Manning. Thank you also for exposing this abysmal official conduct against a US citizen and soldier. This is not a political issue; it is a matter of rule of law. Whatever PFC Manning may have done, he should face proper detention procedure and a court proceeding focused on fact finding in order to determine the truth of his conduct. That he has been so harshly mistreated diminishes justice for everyone; even those wearing civilian clothes.

    I'm not here to support or oppose Manning. I'm here to promote proper and humane legal procedure focused on fact finding. Based on what I've read here, the man appears to face torture in order to coerce a false confession. I remember winning a Cold War in opposition of such official conduct by former enemies of the United States. I remember citizens opposing totalitarian regimes like Stalin and Mao based on the fact that they engaged in tactics like these. To see my own country embrace such conduct only twenty years after the cold war is disheartening.

    What you've done here requires courage and strength in the face of overwhelming institutional power. You have my deepest respect.

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  21. Why is this guy even is jail? He's a hero. He shows us how the US military kills civilians from a helicopter and then, they kill the people that come to help the dead and wounded, vital information in a democracy!. I saw it myself, I heard the dialogue between the murderers on Wikileaks, with my own eyes. I made myself sit through it. This was not a movie, it was their... own video, untouched. It made me wonder how many of these they have? Because you know they have bunches. And then we torture the guy? Huh?

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  22. This is the Department of the Navy Corrections Manual that governs operations at Quantico's brig:

    http://www.usmc.mil/news/publications/Documents/SECNAVINST%201640.9C.pdf

    Note that there are five "custody classifications." Every inmate must be assigned one of them. They are, starting with the most restrictive: Maximum Custody (MAX), Medium Custody In (MDI), Medium Custody Out (MDO), Minimum Custody (MIN), and Installation Custody (IC) - as described starting on Manual Page 4-7.

    The elaboration of "Classification Criteria" in Article 4202.2:

    "All new prisoners, except those specifically deemed to be serious management problems (MAX), shall be assigned a MDI custody classification during the reception phase. Detainees [Bradley Manning's category] shall not be assigned a MDO, MIN or IC custody classification."

    Maximum Custody, as described in Article 4201.2a:

    "Prisoners requiring special custodial supervision because of the high probability of escape, are potentially dangerous or violent, and whose escape would cause concern of a threat to life, property, or national security. Ordinarily, only a small percentage of prisoners shall be classified as MAX."

    Medium Custody In, as described in Article 4201.2b:

    "Prisoners who present security risks not warranting MAX. They are not regarded as dangerous or violent."

    On Thursday (yesterday, the day after the military's Article 138 response was filed) the Pentagon's own spokesman called Bradley Manning's behavior while in custody in Quantico "exemplary," on a national television broadcast. In the English language, "exemplary" can not be read to mean "specifically deemed to be" a "serious management problem." In that same MSNBC interview he (Geoff Morell) stated that sometime recently he accompanied the General Counsel of the Department of Defense (Jeh Johnson) to Quantico (where they apparently avoided actually seeing Manning), undoubtedly with the knowledge (either before or after, or both, accompanied by a full report of their visit) of Secretary of Defense Gates and President Obama.

    Has one single American reporter yet asked one single member of the House or Senate Armed Services Committees (particularly chairmen Carl Levin or Buck McKeon) what, if anything, they propose to do about this obscene abuse of power by the military departments they are charged with overseeing and independently "checking" on behalf of the American people??

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  23. dear lt coombs,

    thank you very much for your representation of pvt manning. i am a 23 year old peace activist that loves our troops but hates the wars we've entered over the last decade.

    no matter what the final verdict of his case, i believe that pvt manning has sparked some important questions about those wars, and because he has become associated with these questions, he is being punished on behalf of all us american civilians who have never taken those wars seriously enough from the start.

    after reading your blog, i am confident pvt manning has excellent representation. thank you very much for your service to our country.

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  24. Make a donation to the Bradley Manning Defense Fund:
    http://www.couragetoresist.org/x/content/view/858/1/

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  25. All true histories of humanity will name Mr. Manning as one of our heroes. His action has helped us greatly at a very critical point in time. (Even Wikileaks enemies acknowledge in private that the revelation of the US cables helped spark the current uprisings in the Middle East; see http://tinyurl.com/66tkjaq .) I hope someone conveys to Mr. Manning that that's how many of us see things. All honor and love to him.

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  26. "Frankly it should be PFC Manning's face as the poster boy for freedom rather than the douchebag, Assange's."

    Couldn´t agree more. If the allegations are true, then Manning is the true hero and the person who made all this possible.
    Leaks have existed long before "Wikileaks" but now many people seem to believe that Assange got the information by himself or something. And while he gets the glory (and takes advantage of it) Manning goes through hell.

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  27. Thank you for everything that you are doing!

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  28. I don't know if you're allowed to pass suggestions, but here's one that's been proposed: Pfc. Manning could go on a hunger strike until the detainee abuse stops.

    Political prisoners in Cuba do this sort of thing, and it's pretty effective in binging about international attention to an issue.

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  29. Vielen Dank für Ihre anhaltende Unterstützung der PFC-Bradley Manning. Ihre Unterstützung bedeutet sehr viel für ihn und seine Verteidigung.

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  30. I AM A NAVY BRIG CHAPLAIN. I can tell you this is simply FUCKED UP!!!! They can put cameras on him. Have other prisoners do suicide watch and count as time off their jail time if he is suicidal. This is inexcusable and unjust.

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  31. What can we do to protest this psychological torture?

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  32. How do we reclaim our democracy. The washington cartel, both parties, are working hard to destroy our democracy. Manning is a glaring example of Power out of control.

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  33. I wish I could find it again in Google. I once read a report to the government that had a ring of being written shortly after the nebulous beginning of the Cold war. It was a report detailing the treatment of prisoners in Soviet jails and the purpose was to give readers insights into the process and the treatment of the prisoners. The report detailed a variety of techniques to "break" inmates in order to get them to "acknowledge" their guilt (not so much "confess", the report noted that when people were arrested, they were already known to be guilty and the interrogation time was strictly designed to obtain a confession). In reading about the treatment Manning has and is receiving, I recognize a number of these. In Manning's case we are constantly led to believe they are natural "outcomes" of procedural demands yet these outcomes match point for point the brutal psychological tactics for wearing down Soviet prisoners and breaking them. That's why, without even speculating on the actual guilt or merit of Manning's case, I at least, for one, understand that whatever is going on is complete BS. Clearly the people in charge of Manning are snapping up any excuse, any wayward remark on Manning's part, to implement these frightening tactics out of pure retribution. *That* makes them no better than Soviet handlers in my book. They aren't being clever and it just looks awful of them. Period.

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  34. LTC Coombs,

    Does it bother you that most of the people that support you and what you're doing are blatantly anti-military? I fully believe that every accused soldier deserves a fair defense, but you've got to be acutely aware that you find yourself on the same side as a ton of people who outright hate the Services, and that they're using the resources you provide them as a means to discredit the military.

    CPT, US Army

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  35. This is a form of torture. It is also a good way to provoke a psychiatric decompensation. Constant noise, disruption from sleep, and cold stimulation due to no clothes or blankets, are all stimulants to the brain. Sleep disruption and cold stimulation are well known to cause manic episodes. Constant light conditions, with or without interfere with sleep, can also precipitate mania or at least psychiatric decompensation. Even if Manning was suicidal, or they wanted to be sure to prevent attempted suicide, there are other well known ways to manage this situation. Since he is in a contained space, an officer can sit outside of his cell with the door open. There is no need for disrobing; this is never done in psychiatric hospitals. Constantly asking if he is "OK" is unnecessary as well. Simple observation will suffice.

    Consider consultation with outside psychiatrists for information about the standard of care in potentially suicidal patients, as well as preventing decompensation due to excessive light, cold and noise stimulation. This is not the standard of care and in fact, falls far below it.

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  36. CPT Anonymous,
    I'm sure a bunch of REMF's like yourself who have never heard a bullet go off are sheeple just like rest of USA! Nazi Germany here we come, I keep hearing that scene were judge kept saying murders, there are no murders in Germany!
    I am a HONORABLE discharged SERVICE-CONNECTED disabled US Army vet and I totally support PFC Manning and think what is being done to him is worse than what we were taught as kids the commies did to people, all he did was show your war-machine lie to the rest country/world as secrets is just what got us in this quagmire! I'll even sign my name as I am not afraid of a bunch of punks? Steven Tuck

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  37. @ anonymous March 5, 2011 - 9:13 PM
    Well, I'm neither blatantly anti-military nor do I outright hate the Service. Nontheless I have to point out that the military discredits itself by ITS OWN actions! Saying that does not mean that everyone in the military is a bad or sadistic person - certainly not! - but if you look at what happened since 9/11 (Gitmo, Abu Ghraib, Bagram, certain incidents in Iraq, now the treatment of Bradley Manning, for instance)... well, that should give everyone food for thought.

    Also, if Obama, Gates & co had just half of the courage Bradley Manning has they could definitely *change* things! Just my 2 cents. Mark Schmidt from Germany

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  38. For the record, I believe that a Nation should have a DEFENSE, not an OFFENSE. Second, I believe that an organized, ordered society should have a civilian police force as an extension of Justice.

    What bothers me about the military is that it consumes an ungodly amount of our national deficit at the expense of the very citizens it is allegedly protecting. That it is spread amongst the world so much that it would make the Romans blush. That it constantly wants to blur the lines of the Posse Comitatus Act and issues internal questionnaires asking its 'heroes' if they would fire on their own citizens. I find the military guilty of making Capitalistic Coitus with its private weapon and hardware makers, private logistics providers, and private mercenary corporations (The list is too long to note). I find your culture of death vile and I am vehemently opposed to such attitudes as a human being. I've seen some of its declassified operations (mostly redacted which is ironic in a free and open society). My particular favorite being Operation Northwoods.

    Im also opposed to Torture (re: Abu Ghraib et,al), however narrowly legally defined. Im opposed to friendly fire cover ups and then using the victim to propagandize and promote enlistment. Frankly Im opposed to your headquarters that are located in an inverted Pentagram down the road from Osiris' symbolic dismembered Phallus. But, I digress...

    Manning is the real issue here. Your ilk have such a grasp on the physiological, psychological and Pavlovian responses of the human machine that Mengele would micturate him self with scientific glee. PVT Manning is at least being treated inhumanely and worst tortured daily. I would be surprised if PVT. Manning consciously existed at all, anymore.

    It is my understanding that nothing sensitive of national security was released. As in no names and ongoing operations. What it seems to me is that the U.S. Military has egg on its face. It reminds me of when light is being shined upon darkness, those that are in the dark want to remain in the dark and if they cant, they attack. You're like a Demon Toddler, metaphorically speaking, of course.

    Civilian, Citizen of the United States of America (I pay your wages)

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  39. As things continue to be, it will continue to be wise for America tourists to wear the Canadian maple leaf when on European holidays.

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  40. You guys all seem to want to prove my point for me?
    CPT Anonymous

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  41. Shssssh!, you guys!! Don't you know that it *risks American lives* whenever abuses by the US military are given publicity? Why, you've probably given the citizens of those Arab countries run by those dictators that the US is so friendly with all sorts of ideas about democracy and so forth just by writing this blog......wait a minute.

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  42. CPT Anonymous:

    It is not LTC Coombs who is giving the military leadership a black eye on this. . . it is their own behavior. The have chosen, for whatever reason, to treat PFC Manning in this way. They hide their decision-making behind a veil of secrecy, and do not explain their rationale. If there is a valid reason behind this, let them come out and say it. If not, at least have the moral decency to admit they are wrong and quit the foul treatment.

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  43. Manning eats three meals a day, is not being beaten, receives regular visitors, receives daily exercise time, and has access to mass media. The fact that you can log on to the internet and read descriptions of how he's being treated negates any argument that the US military is somehow doing something sinister. They're literally hiding nothing from you concerning Manning's treatment.He's being treated like any other spy would be treated when caught releasing government secrets in a war zone. Before you compare us to Communists and Nazis take the time to remember they solved these problems with summary executions in the field.

    Which by the way, either Manning's crimes are alleged and he's being punished pretrial or he's a hero for what he did? Choose an opinion and stick with it. They contradict each other.

    As for whether or not the released documents cost lives, that's impossible to prove without a serious investigation into weather informants whose identies were compromised been hurt or killed as a result of the WikiLeaks release. But I'll say this. I can jump on WikiLeaks or one of their active mirrors and pull up one of my combat patrol debriefs describing my convoy makeup, calsigns, battle damage assessments, lessons learned, and intel analysis following insurgent attacks on my platoon. Insurgents in Iraq and Afghanistan can do that too. The information Manning is accused of having released is not harmless. Anyone who has told you that is flat out lying to you.

    CPT Anonymous

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  44. CPT Anonymous,

    I think it is you that are lying. If you were truthful, you would note that HUMINT is owned by the insurgents in Iraq and Afghanistan. Do you really think documents that are in some cases months if not years old are going to tell them anything that they did not already know? Get real. They have had over ten years to study our convoy makeup, BDA, lessons learned, and intel analysis and collection. Frankly, I suspect the logs were quickly discarded once the lack of true value was determined. As an active duty member, I am, however, glad these documents are out. They show the job that we are doing everyday. A job, by the way, that we were never meant to perform. I think you need to step back from the B.S. you have been fed and ask yourself if six month old - let alone in most cases multiple year old - information on the insurgents would be of any value to you. I think not.

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  45. I love all these anonymous comments. Man up! Anonymous (most recent), being in the military YOU of all people should understand that releasing information to people not authorized to have it is NOT up to us. There are processes for that and Manning went outside the system. He released classified information, whether old, new, damaging or not, that he had no authority to release. I frankly don't care what you think about this war, it's not your decision to make. The military is, and has always been, a tool to carry out a political agenda. When you joined the military, you set aside your personal beliefs to do what your country sent you to do as legally and morally as you possibly could - and then some!

    The answer to your last comment about six month old information - it's still relevant. Information does not need to be fresh to be effective.

    If found guilty, Manning should be given the death penalty. He's not being mistreated, tortured, or any other fictional maltreatment.

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  46. CJ, I guess you were asleep when they taught us about unlawful orders. I also think that your duty to your Country is greater than to your service. Manning may have gone outside of the system - but that doesn't mean he should be given the death penalty if found guilty. It must be nice to live in a World where you can make such snap judgments. For the rest of us, I think we wait to hear what happened and why. If he did do this for a principled reason, then I could never see death as an acceptable punishment. Even the government seems to concede that point! ANONYMOUS but not alone.

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  47. PFC Manning is one of the few American service personnel that can take any pride in the series of illegal human rights violations that characterise the Iraq and Afghan Wars. He is to Iraq what WO1 Hugh Thompson Jr. was to My Lai in Vietnam - which is to say, he is a soldier that was brave enough to refuse to comply with the atrocities going on around about him, even though the majority of his colleagues chose to obey illegal orders and abuse civilians en masse. WO1 Hugh Thompson Jr too was threatened with prosecution and shunned by his colleagues in his time (including a young Colin Powell - then a Major assigned to investigate WO1 Thompson's allegations of atrocities having been committed at My Lai).

    In 20-30 years time, Hollywood will be making films about this time, undoubtedly reflecting painfully on what a dark time it was for America, just as happened with Vietnam. Most current American service personnel who are alive then will no doubt pretend they were against the whole thing all along, and pretend to be of the same moral fibre that PFC Manning has demonstrated. For now, today, only one soldier has been brave enough to put his career and his liberty on the line to highlight human rights abuses US troops: PFC Manning. The US military will only become an institution that America can be proud of when people with the moral fibre and conviction of PFC Manning form the majority of those who serve.

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  48. I would venture to say that war's most detrimental casualty is the debasement of human consciousness. More so than the body and destruction of life. Because it tends to linger like chum. It infects and influences perspective and worldview.

    What blows my mind is the propaganda and deception. It seems as if Military people are uber-nationalistic. At the same time, our political leaders, for decades, have been calling for a 'New World Order' (coined by George H.W. Bush September 11, 1991). It seems as if many of you buy the bullshit about 'freedom' and 'liberation' whilst invading energy rich or strategically located Nations.

    In fact, Its nothing more than securing energy, thereby preserving the status quo and maintaining the Power Plutocracy. Unfortunately, most of you are mere pawns in a Grand Chessboard designed by members of AEI, CFR, IMF, BIS, TC, BC, Bilderberg, Brookings, Ford Foundation, etc, etc, etc.(Members of which include your Generals)

    CPT. says, "The fact that you can log on to the internet and read descriptions of how he's being treated negates any argument that the US military is somehow doing something sinister. They're literally hiding nothing from you concerning Manning's treatment"

    My experience with the military is nothing but lies and mis/disinfo. It all starts with the Recruiter. You (the institution not the individual) eventually cover up and propagandize Tilman, Lie about yellow cake, mobile chemical weapons factories and aluminum tubes, lie about casualty figures, lie about the Gulf of Tonkin, lie about the cost of toilet seats, screws and hammers, lie about threats from Iran, lie about torture and chain of command (a few bad apples??). You lie about the cause of the Financial Nightmare we are entering. Of course, it was Al Qaeda that engineered the financial collapse of 2008. It certainly had nothing to do with the repeal of Glass Steagall, subprime loans, speculation, cdo's, cds', Nothing but lies and deception! On and on it goes.

    Now ask yourself, how can I possibly believe you! If I lied to your face constantly, would you believe me? NO. If you were a single entity you would be easy to discredit in a court of law.

    I remember Padilla (a genuine enemy combatant). His lawyer said that he was a shell of a human being.

    Clearly Manning had a conscience. In my opinion, I dont think he realized the magnitude of his actions. That being said, he went with it and is paying for it dearly. So, as you wave your Chinese made flag while wearing your Chinese made beret and clamor for his head, realize that he has done more for freedom and truth in the one minute it took him to upload it than the Patriot Act, John Warner Defense Authorization Act or COG ever will in 14,225,290,980,386+ Trillion years.

    You do, however, make relevant points in regards to law which contains no room for emotional or moral consideration. Hopefully, Mr. Coombs can help him. He sure needs it.

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  49. 'A ranking US official criticizes Washington-sanctioned torture of a US trooper, who has reportedly exposed the military's use of violence against Iraqi and Afghan civilians. On Thursday, the US State Department spokesman, P.J. Crowley called the treatment of Army private Bradley Manning "ridiculous and counterproductive and stupid," The Washington Post reported.

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